Updated NASAA Member Directory

Thursday, February 10, 2011

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CONTENTS

NationalAssembly of State Arts Agencies

List your statewide event in the Community Calendar

Support the entire state arts agency community with a gift to NASAA's 2012 Annual Fund.
Thank You!

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Announcements and Resources

News and Current Information

NASAA Helps You to Take Charge of Change

Taking Charge of Change screen shot

NASAA has compiled a new resource area, Taking Charge of Change, that supplies state arts agencies with the tools they need to navigate political turnover, arm advocates with the facts and adapt to big changes in state government. Whether you are managing current crises or mapping your course for the future, NASAA can help. This page tells you how.

Tennessee Arts Commission Project Wins Regional Emmy

A broadcast media project funded by the Tennessee Arts Commission was recognized with a 2010 Regional Emmy Award. Creative License, which airs on PBS stations across Tennessee, presents stories about the unique people who create art, and places and groups where the arts are central to everyday life. The show receiving the award featured a story on a young African-American man from a tough, inner-city neighborhood in Memphis talking enthusiastically about his decision to study ballet at the New Ballet Ensemble and School. Creative License grew out of the Commission's Public Awareness Campaign, with the television specials produced in partnership with the Renaissance Center in Dickson. Find out more.

ArtsReady Report: Business-Interruption Planning Tools

The national movement to improve readiness and business continuity planning by arts organizations and artists continues to gain steam. South Arts, the ArtsReady project organizer, knows that state arts agencies are natural allies in arming the arts sector with the tools to be better prepared for any business interruption.

"This is insurance," says Malcolm White, executive director of the Mississippi Arts Commission. "Whether it's a hurricane, power outage or staff absence, arts organizations need to be ready, responsive, and able to recover. The new ArtsReady on-line tool will enable arts organizations to design a readiness plan that is unique to their organization—insurance against the unexpected."

State arts agencies can:

More information: gcombs@southarts.org; mlakinhayes@southarts.org; www.ArtsReady.org; 404-874-7244.

State by State Education Data: Quality Counts 2011

Quality Counts, Education Week's annual report card of state education policies and outcomes, is now available. It is the most comprehensive assessment of the state of American education, providing detailed state data along with tools to manipulate grades for states based on weighting schemes of your choice. Read the press release and executive summary, explore the state-by-state map and more in this special edition. Free registration is required to access some of this content.

Technology Use by Arts Organizations

Arts & IT screen shot

Technology in the Arts has released the results of a survey on technology use in the fields of arts and culture. Arts and I.T.: Technology Adoption and Implementation in Arts Organizations, which includes responses across a broad spectrum of arts and cultural organizations representing a variety of disciplines in the United States and Canada, reveals a snapshot of how the field approaches technology.

Website Technology Guide

Idealware has updated its 2009 guide to four free, open-source systems used to build and manage websites. The 2010 update details the newest versions of Drupal, Joomla, Plone and WordPress. The report, 2010 Comparing Open Source Content Management Systems, is free for download, though registration is required.

State of the States 2011

State of the States banner

Stateline, a project of the Pew Center on the States, has released its annual State of the States report. In addition to budget concerns, key trends and issues for state government this year include redistricting, budget concerns, health care reform, the changing political landscape and . . . budget concerns.

Nominations Open for the National Medal of Arts

Nominations are being accepted for the National Medal of Arts, the highest award given to artists and arts patrons by the U.S. government. Past honorees in the fields of visual, performing and literary arts include Aaron Copland, Ralph Ellison, Jessye Norman, Georgia O'Keeffe, the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation and Ray Charles. The award is presented by the president in a White House ceremony. Any member of the public may submit a nomination on-line. The deadline for 2011 nominations is March 11. For more information, contact the National Endowment for the Arts Office of the Chief of Staff at 202-682-5434.

2010 Save America's Treasures Grants Awarded

The National Park Service and the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH) jointly announce the award of $14.3 million in federal competitive Save America's Treasures grants. The grants are made in collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Save America's Treasures's private partner, the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Sixty-one organizations and agencies will use the grants to conserve nationally significant cultural and historic sites, buildings, objects, documents and collections. Find a list of the recipients and their projects at http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/treasures. See also the PCAH announcement.

Remembering Philip Hanes

Philip Haynes

Longtime arts leader R. Philip Hanes, Jr., died on January 16 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Phil was involved as a champion, provocateur and patron of the public arts funding movement since its earliest days. In 1965, he was appointed as a founding member to the National Council on the Arts by President Lyndon Johnson. Phil was good friends with the first chairs of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), Roger Stevens and Nancy Hanks, as well as Charles Mark, the NEA's first state and regional director; Livingston Biddle; Agnes DeMille; Leonard Bernstein; Isaac Stern; Harper Lee and others who helped establish the NEA.

Phil helped pioneer the local arts agency movement as a founding board member of the Winston-Salem Arts Council, established in 1949. He was the first chairman of the North Carolina Arts Council, serving from 1964-1967, where he was instrumental in the Arts Council becoming a state agency in 1967.

In recognition of his longtime commitment to public arts funding and for his patronage of the arts in America, Phil was presented with the National Medal of Arts in 1991. In 2005, at NASAA's annual conference in Boise, Idaho, NASAA presented him with the Founders Award to honor his leadership as a founder of the public arts funding movement.

My personal relationship with Phil lasted more than 30 years. I met him when I participated in the Salzburg Seminar workshop he presented in Austria in 1978. In fact, Phil's book, How to Get Anyone to Do Anything, had its genesis from those lectures. For Phil, there was always a strong connection between the arts, community welfare and civic life. His strong civic commitment was evident in his contributions to the cultural life and vitality of North Carolina, especially his beloved Winston-Salem. As a lifelong civic leader, Phil had a vision of how government and business could work together to create a public-private partnership that would—and did—build a nationwide infrastructure for the arts.

Working in partnerships—across sectors, across political lines, across disciplines—to leverage public arts support is what NASAA and state arts agencies are all about. As we look to the future of the field, NASAA is honored to have known this leader who did so much to make all of this possible. We wouldn't be where we are today without the vision, commitment and hard work of people who understood all along the role the arts play in advancing our society and enriching our democracy—making life better for all Americans.

—Jonathan Katz, NASAA CEO